Artist

Phoenix – transience and resurrection, end and new beginning

In 2012 a massive fire nearly destroyed Behrens’s entire studio and as a result his sculpture was covered with a thick patina of black soot. The artist processed this dramatic experience by transitioning his loss into artistic creation. The result is Phoenix, a thought provoking transition and .....

Phoenix – transience and resurrection, end and new beginning

In 2012 a massive fire nearly destroyed Behrens’s entire studio and as a result his sculpture was covered with a thick patina of black soot. The artist processed this dramatic experience by transitioning his loss into artistic creation. The result is Phoenix, a thought provoking transition and consistent development of Michael Behrens’s oeuvre.

In the past, Michael’s sculptural work initially focused primarily on the internal structure of the objects. His Seaforms series focuses more on the form of the outer shape. In Phoenix, the artist goes one step further and entirely devotes himself to the abstracted form of the object. The sculpture is reduced to a minimal form and then extra care is provided for whereby its plasticity comes to the fore. Behrens produces contrasting works by deliberate abandonment of color in the classical sense and the interplay of convex and concave surfaces in black and gold. The combination of black and gold follows an intuitive approach. Black is one of the few achromatic colors that, when illuminated on a matte surface, has limited reflective qualities. However, when bright light reflections on the surface of a shiny object, it creates a fascinating depth and glare. The dark and the light are experienced offering both black, the void, the absolute nothingness, darkness, sadness, death, and the opposite gold, the sun-like metal of the gods and kings.

The image of the phoenix from the ashes*

Since antiquity the concept of rebirth has been described with the legend of a mythical bird that burns at the end of its life and then is born again from its own ashes. In ancient Egypt, the symbolism occurred in the bird benu, the reborn. In Persia and China, the resurrected animal was associated with good fortune, loyalty, compassion, and heavenly favor. With the spread of the story to Greece, the bird received the name phoenix, “flaming red”, which symbolized timelessness, immortality as well as the flame.

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Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
48th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: May 8th | Exhibition continues to July 3rd of 2020