Artist

Gazing into Depth

I gaze through the transparent core and see depth.

It all began with a few lines from Goethe’s poem Unbregrenzt (1814, Unlimited)

For what the centre brings

Must obviously be

That which remains to the end

And was there from eternity

Inspired by the 14th-century Persian poet Haféz, Goethe wrote his own Divan. For me, in turn, it was .....

Gazing into Depth

I gaze through the transparent core and see depth.

It all began with a few lines from Goethe’s poem Unbregrenzt (1814, Unlimited)

For what the centre brings

Must obviously be

That which remains to the end

And was there from eternity

Inspired by the 14th-century Persian poet Haféz, Goethe wrote his own Divan. For me, in turn, it was the inspiration for a sculpture, a kind of ‘fathomer’. On the wall, three pieces, three different moments. Almost automatically I resurface and read Rutger Kopland’s poem Concerning Depth (1999). He proposes to use the poems Light, The Valley and Concerning a Glass during a visit to the cabin where he writes his poems.

The path I have taken is rife with associations. My world, seen through a lens. Things seen and unseen.

I work on my ‘fathomers’ and see a void. My own perception turns it into an image, an exchange, an experience. Let me deepen one last association. The Persian way of experiencing things, of narrating. This brings me to the Persian-Dutch writer Kader Abdolah, a born narrator. I hear him reciting Rutger Kopland’s poem Jonge Sla” (young lettuce) in a poetic accent. Beautiful. Coincidence?

I show him my ‘fathomer’. His reaction is one of recognition. Let me tell his story in my own words, in the first person:

It is during my childhood, I am six or seven years old. No television or cinema yet. A group of us are playing in the road. No asphalt, just the kind of road there used to be. All of a sudden this man appears. He is pushing a cart. It is the first time we’ve seen him in our neighbourhood. He has a hat and a moustache, a professor’s beard and spectacles – quite exotic, really. In the middle of the square he comes to halt. He says: I’ve got something new, I can do magic. His cart is not like an ordinary normal cart. A kind of pram, but not open; a closed cart with on one side something covered with a lid.

If we want to see his magic we have to pay. We go home, fetch money – not much, a few pennies – and come back. I sit in front of the cart, in front of the thing with the lid. I pay. The man removes the lid. I look inside and am startled. I recognize something, but at the same time I don’t. I know that boy, but not really. I laugh, I’m surprised and I look at the others. The audience is excited, because I am incapable of describing what I’ve seen. And so the next one pays and the same thing happens all over again. It was a big experience for us all. An unforgettable experience.

It is years later, in the Netherlands. You place your sculpture in my hands. I look inside and am immediately reminded of that man. Persia, childhood. It was beautiful.

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
48th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: May 8th | Exhibition continues to July 3rd of 2020