Artist

Péter Botos

The beams of the rising sun reach the Orange Gate – a statue made of three square pris­ms – and then the light show begins: straight and curved lines, geometrical and amorp­hous spots, and as far as colours are concerned, mainly white, orange, and the colours of the rainbow appear. As the sunrise changes, so .....

The beams of the rising sun reach the Orange Gate – a statue made of three square pris­ms – and then the light show begins: straight and curved lines, geometrical and amorp­hous spots, and as far as colours are concerned, mainly white, orange, and the colours of the rainbow appear. As the sunrise changes, so does the show, and then it comes to an end shortly. A play with light indoors for half an hour. The statue sensitively responds to the slightest changes in light. It is a truly interactive work of art, which is closely related to its environment, absorbing and reflecting it by its own specific means. It is also mobile by encouraging the visitor to start moving, so that they have an urge to grasp and discover all the details. It is constant and changing at the same time. The known and the unknown. On the basis of studies about physics, optics, and human perception, the chain of events can be followed, described and put into words, but this elementary impression is quite different. It is more like a child’s joy when he sees a rainbow, or a basking in lights and colours.

Therefore, the most important sculptures made by Peter Botos can be compared to cer­tain works by Anish Kapoor and Olafur Eliasson, like Cloud gate 2011, the Non-Object statues (Triangle, Oval, Square Twist) 2008-2014, and Seu corpo da obra (Your body of work) 2011, in addition to Room for all colours 1999-2002. In the case of Kapoor, the use of elementary forms and reflections, in the case of Eliasson the use of transparency and objects in single file, and in the case of both, the intensive use of colours and the invol­vement of the environment and the visitors in the work of art actively, partly by means of movement, are similar. Kapoor, Eliasson and Botos are all contemporary artists, who create their works of art through making special use of the laws of physics in a way whi­ch would not have been possible either consciously or technically in the past. They are indeed contemporary works of art.

In which respects are Peter Botos’s creations different? Primarily in their material, whi­ch is optical glass constructed in a block-like manner. The technology of surfaces polish­ed with high accuracy and then glued together limits the possible dimensions; in the case of a statue, a 40cm size already stretches the boundaries of implementation. However, in spite of the small size, the sculpture space in this case does not stretch only from the surface of the statue: one can go into the inner space of the sculpture just like in Elias­son’s works, but this is not done by walking, but by the visitor’s eyes or a camera. Again, similarly to Eliasson’s works, the environment can be seen through the installation, i.e. the statue. The inside of the statue is real and virtual at the same time, an unknown, new dimension to almost everyone. It is not empty and not full. Because it is transparent, it seems to be empty, but the colour of the glass, the inner reflections, the interferences and the occlusions make you understand how solid and much denser than air the glass is.

If you come across a Peter Botos sculpture either at an exhibition or in a collection, spend some time to walk around it, get to know it, use your own eyes to find the spot, moment or impression that fills your heart.

Lajos Barabás – collector

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Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
48th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: May 8th | Exhibition continues to July 3rd of 2020